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SENTRAL PERIFERI. Katja van Ravenstein / Volker Seifried.

 

SENTRAL PERIFERI / SAMVIRKE

Katja van Ravenstein / Volker Seifried

Heidi Rognskog / Mona Eckhoff

 

Opening: June 5 th. 2015, 8 – 10 PM

Exhibition period: June. 6 - 12. 2015

Opening hours (by appointment): Tuesday to Friday 2 - 6 PM, Saturday 1 - 5 PM

Address: Prinz-Georg-Straße 9, D-10827 Berlin

Website: www.prinz-georg.com

For appointments and questions please contact Aage Langhelle’s cell phone 0049-173-6035317

or send an e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

SENTRAL PERIFERI / SAMVIRKE

The exhibition resumes the collaboration of the artists Seifried / Ravenstein from Germany and Rognskog / Eckhoff from Norway, based on a work exchange at the fishing village of Veiholmen on the northwestern coast of Norway.

Common feature of the four artists’ practice within this project is the use of thrown away material from the fishing village. Seifried / Ravenstein have collected wooden planks and boards that have been lying outside and around the houses for years. Rogsnkog / Eckhoff have made use of sorted out furniture and objects from inside the houses.

Looking close the way of working and the processing of the material are diametrically opposed. In Seifried / Ravenstein's work "Sentral Periferi", on display as photographic documentation, the material is strictly processed, cut to a calculated, precise construction. In Rognskog / Eckhoffs works the joints seem to be structured more randomly within a spatial frame defined by walls.

In the sculpture of Seifried / Ravenstein the relationship between nature and culture becomes evident in the form of a rigid manmade structure build of decomposed organic material. It recalls Sol Levitt conceptual minimalism, but from the utmost distance: after the artists' temporary restructuring of the material, the sculpture has again been released to nature’s influence at the western cape of the Island.

The intention of Rognskog / Eckhoff is to put their installation into a feminist tradition with references to quilts and crafts, work that has been considered through the years to lay within the women's domains. This is enhanced by the sound of a sewing machine that runs monotonously and steadily in the gallery space.

By reusing everyday materials and objects, the works place themselves into a long tradition from Assemblage to Arte Povera (Poor Art) - art forms that occurred during the 50s and 60s, and which made use of worthless objects and everyday materials. This hoping to undermine the institutional art practice which tended to have a tradition of exalting art. In the current situation with major environmental problems, one can see the artists' practice of reuse as a value choice and political stance: reduced consumption in order to promote sustainable development.

Recycling and up-cycling have been practiced on Veiholmen long before those terms had the significance they have today.

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SENTRAL PERIFERI. Katja van Ravenstein / Volker Seifried. Detail.

 

SENTRAL PERIFERI

Katja van Ravenstein and Volker Seifried about their project:

 

In situ

Sentral Periferi is meant as a site-specific work in more than just one way. It has been inspired from our early visits on the Internet. First we saw rarely more than a few rocks in the midst of the Atlantique Ocean, but looking closer we realized that most parts of it were covered with wooden constructions. Wood seems to be the material to make this rocky Island accessible. Besides the houses, boathouses and boats there is runways, landings and bridges to cross or reach the water, but no trees.

We decided to go for wood as material and to use only the thrown away or left aside boards and planks we would find. By assembling the wood we would also collect the different colors of the Island. We decided to go for a construction alike the practical ways of constructing things in everyday life. A rigid but irregular shaped grid, resembling a stage or rack, that would deal with the double image of crossing a piece of landscape and the formation of the surrounding landscape itself as a product of structure and chance.


Samvirke 2014

On site, equipped with digital drawings, a model and a tight time schedule we had to reconsider and change step by step some of the formal decisions taken beforehand. Mainly there had been some concessions to be made according to the spatial conditions, which in the end turned out to be very welcome. The shape the piece now has is literally due to the conditions we have found.


The Cape 2015

To finish this project we are happy to place sentral periferi at the western cape of the Island. By elongating the wooden grid downwards partly we have been able to place it in balance over the rocky ground. By the means of putting back respectfully the material we have taken, merely in a different state of composition. The further story of this piece will be up to the wind, the rain and the waves.

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"Look for it at the chamber-attic in the large dresser right next to the green closet in the middle drawer under the fishhook box ... there ... Heidi Rognskog / Mona Eckhoff

 

SAMVIRKE

Heidi Rognskog and Mona Eckhoff

 

By the installation titled "Look for it at the chamber-attic in the large dresser right next to the green closet in the middle drawer under the fishhook box ... there ... ", the artists want to tell a story about houses, rooms, moving and most of all about memory. From the beginning of their collective work they used the techniques of collage and assemblage of found objects and materials. Objects someone got rid of either because they were not useful anymore or had been expired; objects, that should be deleted from memory to be replaced by the applicable standards of some new time. The installation refers to the women’s practice at the resident fishing village at midwinter when the storms were raging most violently out on the sea and the men were out fishing for months at a time.

In their art practice they reflect on their family roots at Veiholmen, but also draw experience from completely different sources as art education and urban life at Czechia, Bergen or Düsseldorf. Rognskog and Eckhoff are currently living in Oslo, running the Samvirke guest studio and gallery at Veiholmen periodically. They are curators of the triennial Nordic art project RASK (filth). Together with other artists they are travelling to small fishing communities in the Nordic countries to work there for a period. By lectures and exhibitions they try to explore the potential meaning of contemporary art for small and marginalized communities.

 

More about the artists in Archive

 

Exhibition with Paul Brody, Veronica Brovall, Emil Holmer, Eva Grøttum, Aage Langhelle, Randi Nygård, Wojciech Olejnik, Soft Turns, Munan Øvrelid.

Opening: December 11 th. 2015, 8 - 10 PM
Paul Brody plays music. Glühwein included.
Within the framework of the exhibition, Nathaniel Levtow will present a short talk (in English) about his forthcoming book, “War of Words,” on the destruction of writing and images in ancient religion. He will compare his research with the artistic practices that can be seen in this exhibition of contemporary art. The intention with this kind of reading is to see the artistic practices in a cultural historical perspective.
Levtow is Associate Professor of Religious Studies, University of Montana, USA. He is currently a Visiting Scholar at Humboldt University in Berlin and a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow.

Exhibition period: December 12 - 19. 2015

Opening hours (by appointment): Tuesday to Friday 2 - 6 PM, Saturday 1 - 5 PM.
For appointments and questions please contact Aage Langhelle’s cell phone 0049-173-6035317
or send an e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

About the Exhibition: The exhibition wants to examine how artists within the field of contemporary art today adopt, modify and re-contextualize texts, images and objects so that a new meaning is formed. The works in the exhibition comprise a wide spectrum of techniques and content. It may be in the form of appropriation, quoting, recycling, reuse, collage, recoating or restructuring of a material. The artists often combine digital tools with classical techniques such as photography, graphics, painting and sculpture in a complex artistic practice
Since ancient times people have strategically changed and recontextualised artifacts to give them another meaning or to ab/use them in conflicts of interest. Today's iconoclasm, the attacks of representations of political and religious power by using violence or publicly symbolic violence clearly shows an interaction between politics, religion and object (text / image).
Aage Langhelle, Curator

History begins with words and images engraved on publically displayed objects. When the inscribed iconography of ancient Mesopotamia was unearthed from the sands of modern Iraq and Syria, it was taken to Europe and displayed as art. But for the ancients who created and interacted with them, these artifacts embodied the beings and events they represented. They were given personal names, fed sacrificial foods, anointed with oil, and installed in sacred houses. They were understood to be alive. Word, image, material, and meaning blended together in artifactual form. In the first cities, at the dawn of literacy, all representation was participation.
Ancient artifacts had long and difficult biographies. They were abducted, displaced, and transformed; burned, smashed, and buried; their engraved images were mutilated, their inscribed words were erased and overwritten. They were inscribed with violent protective curses warning their viewer not to do these things. The ancient evidence of strategically violated artifacts suggests the need for these curses, if not their success. The earliest text-artifacts rightly predict their own violation and destruction.
After resting in the earth for thousands of years, these same objects are actively engaged in the social-political world today. The monuments of ancient Iraq and Syria are targeted again because of the rival identities they embody. They are on public display once more, as their destruction is recorded on digital video for all the world to see.
The human mind evolved to distinguish between different kinds of being, each with its own essence: Animal, Plant, Person, Natural Object, and Artifact. In antiquity, rituals of creation and destruction could violate and blend these categories. Living artifacts were created alongside artifactual living things. Texts and images were brought to life as plants, animals, and humans were instrumentalized. The essence of forms was fluid and changeable. This was more than a religion or symbolic system. It was a language of languages, which somehow articulated and negotiated the links between the human experience and the non-human world. This ancient insight was more than pre-scientific: the mutation of representations transforms social, psychological, and natural worlds.
Nathaniel Levtow

 

The exhibition is supported by the Royal Norwegian Embassy in Berlin.


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A System Is More than the Sum of Its Parts 5. Zum Neuem Leben Erwacht/Elefanten in Deutschland/Asiens Tierhändler Mafia.
Randi 
Nygård 2013.

Randi Nygård
In my work I wonder about basic but complex relations that are impossible to see directly, but that we can imagine through images; traces, recordings and forms, examples are our experience and knowledge of time, the climate, psychology and ecology.

“A System Is More than the Sum of Its Parts 4 and 5” are made by cutting into the layered pages of two magazines, following the outlines of figures and patterns, one image through  another. While lines emerge inside the objects, potent and organic shapes grow out of them. Through new openings inner connections that were invisible come forth.

The flat becomes spatial, the figurative moves towards abstraction, the calculated turns random, the surfaces open up, the pictures expand and figures are found to contain layer upon layer of new forms, making the destructive constructive at the same time. A vital force comes forward from within the material itself.

I would like to create a sense of poetic and intuitive relations, but with rational information as starting points, to understand the world`s connections in a more open manner.

We cannot know the world fully and the gaps between objects and appearances, things and words and meanings and signifiers, make language flexible, constructive, playful and poetic.
We can think of nature as a language of patterns, patterns of geology, biology, evolution and meteorology. Our cultural constructions can be seen as part of these energy flows in plants, animals, materials and landscapes, materializing various potentials. We are a living and thinking thought within natures self-expression.
At the same time we are in many ways now influencing and changing the languages we are part of, through for example, high carbon emissions into the atmosphere. Even if our minds are not detached from the natural world, nature enables us to think, feel and speak about how we can coexist within it.

The two drawings «Living in Denial: Climate Change, Emotions and Everyday Life», inside and outside.» are made by rubbing charcoal over thin paper placed on top of the cover of the book, so that the traces after the reading come forth and create the images.
Randi Nygård

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Soundinstallation. Paul Brody.

Paul Brody
Art Accompanying Noise
All movement is sound. The sounds an artist makes while working reveals the physicality of the art being created. It makes a sonic blueprint of the artist’s actions that is generally ignored and lost as the noises disappear. 

My mini-installations involve composing with the recorded noises of three contrasting artists: a glass collage sculptor, a painter who heats and cools paint, and a poet. Completing the sound-compositions accompanied by the displays of the artwork are the fragmented voices of the artists explaining their methodology. 
Paul Brody

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Still at work. Veronica Brovall

Veronica Brovall
The sculptures in glazed ceramics that Veronica Brovall unites under the title Expose The Bait form a coherent ensemble due to several recurring motifs. The artist appeals to our imagination when she combines hands with the thumb extended upward, tongues, goblets, chains and the words ‘Fuck here’ and reuses these motifs frequently. Due to their shape, colour, and texture, the sculptures look like baked chaos, rustic and uncontrolled. Yet their titles and the motifs used suggest all kinds of associations. The artist prefers that her sculptures generate a very direct effect without imposing a concrete message or interpretation on the observer.
Tanguy Eeckhout  

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Neptune writings. Emil Holmer

Emil Holmer

I have for some time used mechanical processes to achieve another type of imprint than my own hand. The prints are based on a method of reflection and copying. In an initial state I work with metallic mirror foil wich is burnt, perforated, folded and heated with hot glue, fire, plastic etc to create different structures. When scanned, the mirror foil throws the light back into the scanner and creates a visual disturbance, it can be seen as an equivalent of aucoustic feedback; an overload of input in circuit. These visual waveforms constitute a structure in the images.
The final compositions are enlarged, rasterized and printed with silkscreen print on paper.
My work in general draws inspiration from existential themes. As a painter and printmaker, my work is about inventing forms, signs and methods that can incorporate the unliveable into itself.
Emil Holmer

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Aina Mahal. Eva Grøttum

Eva Grøttum
Man kann ihre geometrischen Ornamente auf dem ersten Blick als Ordnungen des Sichtbaren begreifen: Das macht Sinn wenn man dem Ursprung des Ornaments als Kunstform nachgeht, der zum Großteil auf das Bilderverbot inder islamischen Kunst zurückzuführen ist. Doch auf dem zweiten Blick wird deutlich, dass es sich bei den Ornamenten von Eva Grøttum eigentlich um Ordnungen des Unsichtbaren handelt. Eva Grøttum will in die Tiefe unter die Oberfläche, sie bildet nichts Sichtbares ab, sondern sie strukturiert Sichtbarkeit. Dabei isoliert oder auch extrahiert sie einzelne in sich als vollkommen anzusehende Formen, die sie wiederum zu einer neuen Textur verwebt – einer Textur, die zwischen Fläche und Raum oszilliert.

All ihre geometrischen Ornamente sind sehr dicht. Wir sehen komplexe Muster: symmetrische Anordnungen universeller Formen, die in rhythmischen Abfolgen gleichmäßig die Bildfläche überziehen: Kreise, Quadrate, Rechtecke, runde Formen und solche, die einen rechten Winkel bilden, werden vielfach repetiert und variiert. Der rechte Winkel als raumbildendes Element spielt hier eine wichtige Rolle. Bezugspunkt dieser Arbeiten ist wie schon gesagt der indische Palast „Ania Mahal“: Besonders fasziniert war die Künstlerin hier von einem Architekturelement, dem Jali, das man mit „Netz“ und auch „Gitter“ übersetzen kann. Ein Jali kann man mit einem gotischen Maßwerk vergleichen, das meist aus fein gearbeiteten geometrischen Ornamenten oder aus floralen Motiven besteht.
Karin Rase

uncertain maps

Uncertain Maps. Aage Langhelle

Aage Langhelle
Langhelle’s image space is removing itself from its referential starting point and demonstrates that photography always will be a space for negotiations between different characters and wills, figurative and conceptual. Its claimed neutrality and clear causality haslong been problematized, not least as a result of linguistic and semiotic theories, and became, with the digitalisation, even more unusable as characterisation. Also, a pure recording of visuality assumes a selection, and the silenced excerpt, whose initial information has been pushed into the background, is being used to achieve something, if only a meaning-bearing expression.

In certain ways, both Uncertain Maps and Whiteout Maps are dealing with the current position of photography as a complex medium, squeezed between artistic recognition and specialisation on one side and the image flow of everyday life on the other. Photographs are very easily accessible through Internet, not least as a base for further visual production. To a certain degree this enormous selection makes the camera redundant. Google’s search engines present the images we search for in a flash,systemised by theme. The material processing of photography that Langhelle’s two series represent is, in that respect, resolute in its expression — they insist on a genuine presence in the free play of the ink. Even though they are photographed, they indicate a strong tactility, like visual traces that area result of the layering of effects.
Line Ulekleiv

cityplan

Cityplan.Wojciech Olejnik

Wojciech Olejnik
In recent drawings, I have been creasing and folding paper to render objects and architectural spaces.  The folded image gives the impression of forcing itself into the space; the way buildings force themselves into bedrock or a city block.  These folds extend beyond the perimeter of the imprinted object, seeming to radiate its presence, while simultaneously masking the very objects they endeavour to depict.  Washes of pigment further conceal the already faint image, as I saturate the paper with mixes of paint, beach-sand and water.  The resulting images develop from the unresolved tension between the force of the folds and the flattening (and wrinkling) effect of earth and water. 
Wojciech Olejnik

fluoscene

 Fluorescence. Viedostill. Soft Turns

Soft Turns
We began developing the video installation, Fluorescence, as a residency/commission project for Trinity Square Video, Toronto, but always intended to expand it to a larger installation (of eight or more channels). Our source material, the university textbook, “Biology of Plants,” provided us with many interesting subjects as well as intriguing variations on their presentation as images. Across the eight editions published between 1970-2012, the same microscopic subjects appear again and again, though every so often they are presented in a slightly altered magnification, or depicted using a different kind of microscope. Some of these photographs have noticeably yellowed, or were printed in warmer or cooler tones; others have been cropped, or introduce helpful symbols (such as arrows). As our videos flip through versions of the same image from different editions, sometimes the change is so slight, it is seen only in how creases in the page catch the reflected light of the laptop screen. For us, it is as though each iteration presents a unique specimen with which to build a more complex understanding of the various features of a species. Yet overall, as one image progresses to the next, what most catches the eye are the differences in iridescence, which has nothing to do with the image’s age, but rather, the manual way the ink was printed and absorbed by the paper, as well as the particular angle of light reflecting from a handheld laptop. And so what is left for the viewer’s scrutiny are aspects usually perceivable by a more sensitive apparatus than the eye. These are the kinds of things we want to bring awareness to: what is subtle, barely interesting, like the amount of light emitted from a monitor’s screen. Our installation employs a variety of recent and older makes of monitors, and the sheen on their surfaces and varying reflectiveness of their displays mirror the visuals depicted in the videos. Meanwhile, the monitors emit a light that pulses in tune with the moving laptop light, as it approaches, and pulls away from its subjects. At times, there is just enough light emitted for photosynthesis to take place. All of this is meant to draw viewers into a contemplative, reflective response to the imagery, where expectations can be challenged through active engagement.
Soft Turns

Supported by:

2014 OAC BK JPG logo

 

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A Sense of a Beginning. Videostill. Munan Øvrelid

Munan Øvrelid

A sense of a beginning 
The video shows a series of reproductions of a neo-classisistic bust of Friedrich Schiller, the German antimodern romantic poet. These white sculptures move slowly forward on a assembly line, and fall in slow motion from its end and break.This process repeats itself over and over, every time the sculptures break in to smaller and smaller pieces. In the end there is only white powder left. The white powder pours down in a thin line, creating a white mountain of dust, like a timeglass that has run out of time. Sentences from On naive and sentimental poetry, a text by Schiller runs as subtitles.
The text describes a sublime form in nature that cant be mediated through culture. The text ends with the line time shall seize to exist, and the world shall again be one.
Munan Øvrelid

 

 More about the artists in Archive

 

bild1 kirkebo kopiTotal Monument. Tusche auf Papier. Kay Arne Kirkebø 2016.
Cubecity

Cubecity.Tusche auf Papier. Kay Arne Kirkebø 2015.

Isometric Structures besteht aus überaus detaillierten Tuschezeichnungen isometrischer Räume und Stadtlandschaften. Durch einen schematischen Prozess mit selbst definiertem Regelwerk werden instruierende Architektur und labyrinthische Strukturen geschildert. Wiederholung und Langsamkeit ist das immer wiederkehrende Thema im künstlerischen Ausdruck sowie für den Arbeitsprozess Kirkebøs. 

Ausstellung mit Kay Arne Kirkebø und Aage Langhelle

Eröffnung: 4. November 2016,  20 - 22 Uhr

Ausstellungszeitraum: 5. - 13. November 

Öffnungszeiten: Samstag 5. 14 - 20 Uhr. Sonntag 6. 12 - 18 Uhr. 

Öffnungszeiten nach Voranmeldung: Dienstag 8. – Sonntag 13. 14 -18 Uhr.
Für eine Voranmeldung oder Fragen kontaktieren Sie bitte Aage Langhelle unter der Handy-Nr. 0173-6035317 oder schicken Sie eine E-Mail an: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .


Kurz über die Ausstellung:
Different as they may seem at first glance, a closer investigation of the art of Aage Langhelle and Kay Arne Kirkebø, as seen at prinz-georg // raum für kunst, reveals unexpected resemblances: Reflections on random structures, privacy and urban life lie at the surface of both œuvres. 

Tracing the chemical urban pathways of Langhelle, the viewer stumbles across Kirkebø's detailed, large-scale interwoven lines – cold, modular structures, tailored to fit human existence in ways recognizable from dystopian sci-fi such as Huxley's Brave New World and Lucas' THX 1138. Collective dwellings, operating at maximum efficiency while individual citizens are molded to fit into edifices created by and for the masses, offer shelter to unknown passers-by. What are these minute figures – scattered about Metropolises of the imagination – doing, where are they going, what could they be thinking? Langhelle’s interwoven pathways also bring to mind neural networks – micro and macro, simultaneously.

Both artists work within strict frameworks which enable their work to bloom intuitively and grow organically – dancing in chains, as Nietzsche wrote in reference to the abundant inspiration offered to the ancient poets through mastery of rigid verse structures. In the œuvres of Langhelle and Kirkebø, set-up, material and artist become a unified whole, generating variations, or mutations if thou wilt, an alchemy of randomness and control akin to organic life’s potential for endless variation. This artwork extends to the edge of the paper – and beyond.

Rasmus Hungnes. Editor-in-chief, KUNSTforum 
Please scroll down for the whole Article.

Die Ausstellung wird von der Königlich Norwegischen Botschaft unterstützt.

 

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Uncertain Traces — Comments on Mapping in-between Order and Randomness. Tusche auf Fotopapier 106x145 cm. Aage Langhelle 2016. 
Mit Tusche sowie durch seine Handbewegungen erschafft Langhelle eine organische Karte inmitten Ordnung und Zufall. Langhelle erforscht kulturelle sowie natürliche Systeme und Strukturen. Einfache Gegensatzpaare werden in den Bildern von x-fach möglichen Zusammenhängen abgelöst. Zufällige Ordnung vermischt sich mit geordnetem Zufall. In Langhelles Arbeiten sind Konzept, Inhalt und formale Aspekte zu einer dichten Einheit verwebt, sowohl in den einzelnen Werken als auch in der Verbindung zwischen den Arbeiten.


Mapping structures – explored from a distance

As it first meets the eye, the art of Kay Arne Kirkebø and the art of Aage Langhelle may strike the beholder as fundamentally different. Kirkebø's clean black and white cityscapes contain an impressive amount of detail, radiate a great abundance of control. Langhelle's chaotic, colorful painterly abstractions rest upon paper which has apparently taken a heavy beating, where errant lines and smudged ink weave into each other in webs of erratic, seemingly random pathways. But still, both artists chose the other as artistic reflections of their own work for a series of exhibitions, of which Mapping structures – explored from a distance constitutes the first. And as it turns out upon closer examination of their œuvres, unexpected similarities rise to the surface.

The most readily apparent common denominator is the representational navigation of urban life. Kirkebø, in the series Isometric Structures, draws maps of constructed manifestations of the imagination. While his game world-like maps are indisputably figurative, the real-world references within Langhelle's ongoing series are far more abstract. Langhelle has long dealt with notions of urbanity, often focusing on minute details, the unnoticed, the seemingly insignificant constituents of city life.

His series Uncertain Traces — Comments on Mapping in-between Order and Randomness is an evolution of Uncertain Maps, a body of work where photos of details from the urban scene are used as the starting point. Aage Langhelle´s photographic practice, as seen in Uncertain Maps, documents objects – such as birdhouses, discarded furniture, scarves hung from branches and lamp posts by protesters to commemorate victims of violent clashes, water bowls for dogs – left by Berliners on the street – non-verbal acts of communication articulated through miniature interventions in public space. These snapshots of the urban microcosm are printed onto photo paper, before being covered in inked networks of lines. These, in turn, are washed, treated with heat, drawn upon once more, the process repeated until the original image is transformed to the limits of recogntion.

The juxtaposition, or superimposition of reality and pure abstraction, could be said to be a treatment of both the macroscopic – city planning, infrastructure, satellite imagery – and microscopic – traces, remnants, of individual life. In Uncertain Traces — Comments on Mapping in-between Order and Randomness, a new series made for Mapping structures – explored from a distance, Langhelle has abandoned the photographic altogether (except from the actual photo paper), thereby distilling the creative process down to the purely material, emphasizing qualities pertaining to artistic control versus tumultuous physical conditions, giving rise to a unique color spectrum as well as cracks and bulges in the paper – a topography guiding the flow of rivers of ink. By removing the photographic references (even though they were never easily recognizable, obscured by layers of cracks and ink), Langhelle shifts his focus to these layers of material interactions, possible interpretations and ways of perception.

Kirkebø’s cityscapes, on the other hand, manifest as futuristic fantasies of a dystopian world, bringing to mind the cold societal structures of Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and George Lucas’ THX 1138. Here, people are faceless, featureless, seemingly going about their daily routine without complaint nor joy – a notable exception being one unfortunate suicide which goes by rather unnoticed in the artist’s book Walkthrough (2015). These are futurescapes where architecture seems to be reduced, or distilled, into modules moulded to fit the needs of the masses, and the masses moulded to fit into their modules. The system is rigid, but a closer look will reveal the hand-drawn quality of the line.

The title Walkthrough is a reference to guides for beating video games. In computer games, especially concerning the 90's era, one talks about two kinds of bird's eye views of the in-game world: isometric and top-down perspective. The isometric (projections of three-dimensional space on a flat surface where the world is seen at a slight angle, tilted towards the horizon so to speak, while elements remain the same scale even towards this «horizon»), as seen in classic tactical games such as Syndicate (1993) and UFO: Enemy Unknown (1994) (two of Kirkebø's early influences), could be viewed as a modern heritage of the shifts in perspective sometimes apparent in Chinese hand scrolls depicting urban environments. The top-down perspective, where the depicted world is seen from straight above, at a right angle, brings to mind the early abstractions of Kazimir Malevich's proto-colour field paintings such as Suprematist Composition: Airplane Flying (1915) – a far more fitting reference for Langhelle's Uncertain Maps and Uncertain Traces, which are in part influenced by phenomenon such as Google Maps and Google Earth depicting the surface of our planet by satellite imagery, than the apparent visual similarity to Jackson Pollock’s dripster painting. Langhelle’s images could, akin to Wassily Kandinsky’s non-representational painting, be thought of as intermediaries between the inner and outer world: the inner explored from the outer, and vice versa – from a distance.

The art – the creative process and resulting images alike – of Langhelle and Kirkebø both possess a contemplative quality at their core. Langhelle enters a sort of meditative state, an intuitive, nearly non-thinking flow, while working on his pictures. The resulting patterns – requiring intensive work, editing and repetition – bring to mind both street maps and neural networks, lines intertwined with lines which often seem to be frozen in the midst of a choreographed set of movements. The rhythm flows organically, but is certainly also tight – as the artist himself puts it: It has to swing. But the patterns are in no way calculated – they arise, organically, arbitrarily and fluently, like synaptic connections of the brain or asphalt around housing blocks. Kirkebø also “dances in chains”, as Nietzsche said about the abundant inspiration offered to the old poets by imposing constraints on themselves.  His Isometric Structures start out from the setting up of rulers and compasses. Thus, the stage – of paper – is set for the artist's hand to get to work. The process is fluid, where – akin to what comics writer Alan Moore once said in an interview about the inspiration for writing coming out of the act of writing – the drawing “grows” out of itself, line by line, room after room, building to building. In Isometric Structures, the artist is the intuitive creator, and omniscience is bestowed by Him upon the viewer.

The subtitle of Langhelle’s work – Comments on Mapping in-between Order and Randomness – seems to provide a key of sorts to the decryption of the collaboration at hand. The ancient Chinese sages created the I Ching, a divinatory system involving the throwing of sticks and the subsequent interpretation of the incidental result, because they believed that random events – due to the very fact that they are devoid of apparent, instant, inherent meaning – may reveal deeper truths. Even though the structures they map out are explored from a distance, the art of Aage Langhelle and Kay Arne Kirkebø demands a closer look. Your patient glance may be well rewarded.

Rasmus Hungnes. Editor-in-chief, KUNSTforum, Norway

Mehr über die Künstler im Archiv

 

Rescue Reinhardt

Rescue Ölmalerei. Claudia Reinhardt 2016.

Three Exhibitions: RESCUE Claudia Reinhardt. CRAWLSPACE Per Teljer. SAVE OUR SOULS Jorun Viken

Opening: December 16 th. 2016, 8 - 10 PM. Glühwein included. 

Address: prinz-georg // raum für kunst. Prinz-Georg-Straße 9. 10827 Berlin

Exhibition period: December 17. - 23. 2016

Opening hours (by appointment): Tuesday to Friday 2 - 6 PM, Saturday 1 - 5 PM. 

For appointments and questions please contact Aage Langhelle’s cell phone 0049-173-6035317

or send an e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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About the Exhibition:

Claudia Reinhardt is known for her staged photographs, often produced as extended series over a period of many years. Her most recent series,  TOMB OF LOVE – GRABKAMMER DER LIEBE was published in March by Berlin’s Verbrecher Verlag.
At prinz-geeorg // raum für kunst Reinhardt will exhibit drawings and oil paintings for the first time. Her large scale water colors are made from a collection of small drawings, which she has assembled into collages entitled THE WORLD PART I and PART II.  Countless events that occurred between May and July 2016, which were circulated by the media, appear here in a format that scrambles them while literally drawing them together. Reinhardt’s paintings also refer to current world events. They deploy imagery that acts as a visual metaphor for our current social condition. The artist’s painstaking, time-intensive process helps to sort through and make sense of today’s flood of images, acting as a counterweight to the sheer mass of media commentaries and critiques that Reinhardt appropriates and interrogates.

 Bunny Teljer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bunny
32x30 cm. Öl auf Leinwand. Per Teljer 2016.

Per Teljer is since the mid nineties foremost known as film/video artist. In the beginning in the video art group Sunny Heart Videos (1994-1997) and after that with own productions. In 2014 however, he put the camera aside and returned back to drawing and painting. At Prinz Georg he will present works produced in the fall of 2016.  Low-voiced and fatal works in charcoal and oil on canvas.

 

viken

Save Our Souls Tusche auf Papier. 200x135 cm. Jorun Viken 2015.

The exhibition presents differently scaled ink drawings of animals. Anatomical drawings of animals are Jorun Viken‘s point of origin. However, the progressive assembling of the animal‘s anatomy is followed by desintegration. The factual drawing study goes unchecked, and the drawings gradually change their character. A drawn organic construction is partly deconstructed. Viken‘s streak is expressive and powerful. Spreading over the arc, the ink is washing out the constructive figures and contributing to an atmosphere of doom.


More about the artists in  Archiv

 

grottum3

Buttonhole  Fotopolymer print. 2017

Interlace / Eva Grøttum 

Opening: May12 th. 2017, 8 - 10 PM. 

Address:  prinz-georg // raum für kunst. Prinz-Georg-Straße 9. 10827 Berlin

Exhibition period: May 13. - 19. 2017

Opening hours (by appointment): Tuesday to Friday 2 - 6 PM, Saturday 1 - 5 PM. 

For appointments and questions please contact Aage Langhelle’s cell phone 0049-173-6035317

or send an e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

About the Exhibition:

Minimal complex
Eva Grøttum often starts her artistic work process by investigating a picture of a pattern, an embroidery or a geometric ornament from cultural history and the history of science.
In Grøttum’s visual investigations, an embroidery or an ornament is transformed into a stylized quote in the shape of dots, lines and surface. That which is culturally coded, for instance a pattern from a Norwegian traditional dress, gets a more universal design and is printed with the help of a stencil on fabric, paper or sheet metal.
In some of her newer works, she also makes use of the results of scientific research. She combines drawings of molecular connexions with watercolours of flowers.
In other works in this exhibition, one can see an ornamental hand drawing on top of a fragment of an older graphic artwork of the artist. She uses duality, two components, as a basic principle, for instance a hand-drawn pattern on top of a standardized chequered paper, a faded piece of paper or one of the artist’s own graphic works.
The lines Grøttum draws in present time are laid as a layer on top of the lines of an artwork from her past. With the help of time and space on several levels, a new visual space emerges, a poetic visual universe that is created in a dialectic relationship. Some of Grøttum’s pictures are like objects for contemplation.
Grøttum’s work method, where she is citing originals from different cultural arenas, and also is reusing her own artworks, is reminiscent of a superordinate level. If one would read Grøttum’s works with an academic approach, they could be seen as visual ontological questions. In ontology, the classic question of whether there are any general laws in social systems and structures, such as there are in physics, is raised. Most ornaments originate from myths and stories, and that is also the case in Grøttum’s work with Islamic and Indian geometric pattern tradition. Grøttum is deconstructing patterns and ornaments into building blocks that she uses in her own work, where they are constructed into something new. Her method gives reason to view the artworks on such a superordinate level. She is transforming a known element into a new context and visual representation. In this way, one also gets a new view on what one thinks one knows.
If one views Grøttum’s works in their concrete and reduced form, they also enter into the tradition of minimalism, where the idea of the immanent artwork was central. But also in this context, I see a duality – the work as form and at the same time as a meta-comment to this type of late modernistic art. Also by their apparent references to philosophy and art history, Grøttum’s works emphasise the notion of the immanent artwork as a pure illusion.
To me, it is natural to characterise her almost ethnologic practice as an artistic fundamental research that is covering several fields like contemporary art, cultural history and history of science.

Curator Aage Langhelle

More about the Artist in Archive

 

forside

Collage. Ogar Grafes and Tore Magne Gundersens Textile Works.

 

Urknallmutter  / Ogar Grafe und Tore Magne Gundersen

Eröffnung: 8. September 2017,  20 - 22 Uhr. 
Performance: Ogar Grafe

Ort: prinz-georg // raum für kunst. Prinz-Georg-Straße 9. 10827 Berlin

Ausstellungszeitraum: 9 - 15. September 

Öffnungszeiten (nach Voranmeldung): Samstag 13 -17 Uhr. Dienstag – Freitag 14 -18 Uhr

Für eine Voranmeldung oder Fragen kontaktieren Sie bitte Aage Langhelle unter der Handy-Nr. 0173-6035317 oder schicken Sie eine E-Mail an: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Catalog as pdf 

About the Exhibition:

As in the theater of the absurd, in this exhibition minor events and the great questions of life are interwoven to create a wild, loose network. Perhaps the exhibition Urknallmutter has a meaning and intention—or perhaps it doesn’t.

The subject matter is primarily shaped by a personally shaped mythology, where individual narratives touch on spiritual and mystical aspects in art and culture. Both narratives work with handicrafts, concretely and metaphorically in the sense of a personal space or a sphere linked to physical experiences of life on earth. Tore Magne Gundersen’s works can be associated with Christianity, while Ogar Grafe’s artistic practice stands in an esoteric tradition with references to modern occultism and Sufism. In the works of both artists, inspirations from the so-called primitive and folk art are evident.

Gundersen began his knitting work in the context of the illness and death of his mother Maren. Perhaps it can thus be seen as a kind of work of mourning. One of the textile objects bears the title Mantel for Maren, or Coat for Maren. The works can also evoke associations of protective clothing or perhaps mystical altarpieces. But at first glance, they seem la bit like masks or knitted portraits, something they share with the series of watercolors TM Faced and TM Landscaped.

The series TM Landscaped shows self-portraits as landscapes. Viewing oneself dissolved as a landscape is like a Buddhist practice of mediation where one is to imagine rotting corpses in order to come to terms with death. One takes control of one’s demons, and not the other way around. Gundersen’s works engage with existential issues by granting them a form, thus moving volatile thoughts and images to consciousness.

Grafe’s performances, which frequently involve burning tea candles, “wild” movements, and loud incantations, hark back to the spiritual séances and phenomena of H. P. Blavatsky and the ecstatic whirling dances of the Sufis. After the performance, the props are staged as independent objects all their own. The object Bastet, which shows the cat goddess from Egyptian mythology, also conjures H. P. Blavatsky’s writings on the lost high cultures of Atlantis and ancient Egypt.

The series Portraits of Women, in which we encounter H. P. Blavatsky, Gertrude Stein, and Valeksa Gert, confronts viewers in several pictures with written challenges in the form of a text written in mirror-reverse. The objects in the series Labyrinthine Handiwork consist of skulls that are completed covered with a colorful embroidered mask. This could be read as an attempt to arrest life and to hold off death, which, as we know, comes inexorably: an existential masquerade.

Gundersen lives in Oslo and knits coats that are dedicated to the artist’s deceased mother and his female ancestors. Grafe lives in Berlin and embroiders a skull from the anatomic theater. Separated by time and spatial distance, they create an exhibition like a storied patchwork quilt.
Aage Langhelle, curator

 

After the Mothers The Sons are the Next to Die
Notes on Urknallmutter

Anyone who came in contact with feminism and the ecology movement as a teenager in the late 1970s will be familiar with the idea of the mother goddess. Demeter products were en vogue, as was The White Goddess, a book by the British poet Robert Graves that had already been published in 1948. Poetry and lyricism, according to Graves, has its origins in the matriarchal age and draw their magic from the moon, not the sun. The notion of the great mother, the white goddess of many names, can primarily be traced back to the myth constructions of the late 19th and early 20th centuries inspired by the discovery of Stone Age statuettes like the famous Venus of Willendorf. But in the 1970s, the myth of the great mother left its mark on alternative culture and the feminist movement.
In the early 1980s, heathen cults, shamans, witches, esoteric practices, and holistic medicines gained strength. But in response, feminist and queer currents also took shape, influenced by punk-rock, post-structuralism, and left wing thinking, that turned against this very aspect of biological determination and the dictum of fertility, against health, divine orders and the idea of the primordial. Later, during the AIDS crisis in the late 1980s and early 1990s, thinkers like Judith Butler argued vehemently against notions of a normative gender and heterosexual role models. As a counter-model to the biological founded binary construction of gender, Butler declared gender a performative model that is formed by the repetition of speech acts, and not a natural and unavoidable absolute.
The joint exhibition Urknallmutter surely has one of its origins in just this discursive field of tension that surrounded both Tore Magne Gundersen and Ogar Grafe in their youth and at the start of their artistic careers. “Urknallmutter” (Big Bang Mother) could refer to the ultimate form of female creation and fertility. The Great Mother stands at the start of all life, the entire universe. And yet, looking at the maternal figures and goddesses in Tore Magne Gundersen’s and Ogar Grafe’s cosmos, they are anything but voluptuously feminine primordial beings. They represent not the beginning, but apparently the end, extinction, departure from life as we know it. The mother is dead, she is gone, or she needs help, like a young child.
The ancient Egyptian cat goddess Bastet was originally a goddess of fertility. But Ogar Grafe’s dressmaker’s mannequin of the same name, branded with an alien-like head in Edding markers under which a women’s handbag is draped, holding a preserves jar containing the skull of a cat, seems more like a psychedelic relation of the calaveras, the skeletons of papier-mâché, plaster, or sugar that are carried through the streets on the Mexican Day of the Dead, just like the embroidered skeleton of his Opiumqueen (1999–2017). Both goddesses wear heads or wigs of extinguished tea candles: the ritual is over, the flames that were bursting out from their soul or their spirit, have gone out. What remains are left-overs, relics, shells, skeletons, the building is empty, the guests have to be summoned to return. 
The same applies to Tore Magne Gundersen’s Coats for his female ancestors. They are shells for memories, protective coats for the delicate souls of the dead. Gundersen began to knit these immense knitted structures, hybrids of wall hangings and cloaks, when his mother Maren was forced to move to an elderly care facility due to illness and frailty; her son visited her often there. He purchases and finds wool, or receives it as a gift. He knits smaller and larger pieces together, combining them like a patchwork or a collage of fabrics, increasingly sewing in fabrics and furs that he finds in his apartment. After several years, Maren became weaker and weaker, and finally she refused all food and medicine. It was some time after her death that he decided to dedicate his knitted works like Coat For Ingeborg Tomine (2016) to his female ancestors, or Coat for Maren to his mother. “I think she had a good life, at least she said she did,” according to the artist. “When we spoke about my depressions, she said she never experienced anything like that. A least not before the last three years of her life, when she only wanted to die. She couldn’t understand why God let her suffer this pain, this meaningless life. Although I’m not really religious, I also couldn’t understand why God allowed it.” All the same, Gundersen rigorously denies the notion that this is a work of mourning. If it is, he says, it is only in an unconscious way.
In his oeuvre, the knitted fabric sculptures refer to a further development, and yet a paradoxical one, for the path leads through regression. His work with frowned upon handicrafts turns toward the “feminine,” literally to the soft, vulnerable. Gundersen was influenced early on by Edvard Munch’s (1863–1944) Nordic symbolism, but also by romantic landscape painters like Hans Fredrik Gude (1825-1903) or Johan Christian Clausen Dahl (1788-1857). Later, expressionism became for him the “highest art form.” In particular, he was fascinated by the notion of the artist as redeemer, as “exemplary sufferer,” as described by Susan Sontag in her 1966 essay. But at art school, he turned to concrete art, to constructivism and supermatism. Like Ogar Grafe in Berlin, in Oslo in the late 1980s and early 1990s he was surrounded by a post-conceptual art world: “I begin to make installations that recalled the early works of Imi Knoebel. I moved entirely in the realm of post-modern thought. And at the same time, I interpreted the works in a mystical way. For example, in 1990 I called an installation at the Oslo gallery UKS The Forefathers, rather phallic-Freudian wooden sculptures.”
A transformation can already be seen in Gundersen’s prints and drawings from the early 2000s. The works become increasingly surrealist, mystical, illustrative, while his painting in this period seems to be influenced by Philip Guston’s late figurative work. The paintings are unbelievably physical, full of voluptuousness and heaviness, but also fairy-tale like, narrative like an illustrated storybook.
The fairy-tale mythological aspect runs through Ogar Grafe’s work from his childhood onward. During the 1980s, Grafe was part of the active Berlin alternative scene, working in music, the fine arts, and performance. Grafe started out as co-founder of the gay experimental film group Teufelsbergproduktion, which achieved cult status with its low-low-budget films on suburban housewives and vigilantes, cannibal teachers and possessed nuns. But the film and costume work developed increasingly into performances, readings, concerts, dance theater, and work on surreal objects in the periphery of the artist group Die Tödliche Doris. When he cofounded the artist group Louvreboutique in the late 1980s, this was also a reaction to the barrenness and reduction of the art world at the time, which was shaped by the language of institutional critique and rather hermetically focused on itself and the art business. While increasing numbers of artists undertook minimalist “interventions” in spaces and institutions, engaged in textual work, appearing as producers, having their objects or light boxes industrially made, the works by Grafe and Louvreboutique are emphatically auto-didactical, narrative, and folkloric in quality. Grafe batiks and embroiders pictures, casts tables in sugar, creates life-size sculptures of hemp and horse chestnuts.
His works tell of spirits, possession, and vision, but with a certain ambivalence. Exhibition titles like “Scheiß Korbmöbel” (Fucking Wicker Furniture) or “Pullunderbeermädchenwege” (Sweater Vest Berry Girl Paths) allude not just ironically to design and fashion, but also imply that like punk rock it could also be a great capitalist sham, a pose that is entirely inauthentic and artificial.
He has continued to develop this posture until today. For example, he calls the ink drawings (2008–2009) on view in Urknallmutter poly-spiritual decorations, his installation Antipopshop – Prokryptische Träume mit dem Glaszwerg with a suit of armor consisting of tea candle holders (2010). It is not only Grafe brought spiritualism in the proximity to decoration, the pop shop, Keith Haring’s ingeniously failed idea of an art for all, becomes the epitome of an art world that increasingly operates like the corporate world. The corporate identity of museums like MoMA is generated in the museum shop, with branded tote bags and coffee ships with reproductions of “best of” masterpieces. The canon of modernism is propagated on erasers and refrigerator magnets. As a counter-model to this monopoly on interpretation and all the merciless marketing, Grafe develops the anti-popshop, a spiritual, anti-capitalist shop, where everything is personal, everything is unique, everything is pop. It is no accident that Grafe’s materials are consciously “poor,” everything in his art deals with the overlooked beauty of the forgotten and discarded.
According to Grafe, the found pieces that he includes in sculptures like Bastet also reminded him of his visit to the catacombs at Naples’ Fontanelle Cemetery. At this cemetery, relatives leave tokens for their loved ones among the piles of skulls and collections of bones: bus tickets, cookies, Barbie dolls. The cemetery has the feel of a flea market.
A great deal of Grafe’s works engages with loss, mourning, powerlessness, or fugacity. In fact, the handbag used in Bastet once belonged to the aunt of a best friend who died of Alzheimer’s, a person he was quite fond of. One of his ink drawings is also dedicated to his mother, who also died of dementia. The proximity between things experienced by the artist himself, his own biography and the work itself, is unmistakable. But at the same time, there is an artistic attitude that, almost Buddhist like, steps back from life and examines it like wool, found objects, or copied magazine images as artistic material. Grafe’s works are very deep, but never pathetic or psychologizing. They are soaked in the knowledge of art history and pop culture, the poetry of Edith Sitwell, the surrealism of Meret Oppenheimer and the Italian horror films of Mario Bava, like Black Sunday (1960). 
​Like Gundersen’s works, Grafe’s works also reach far back into his childhood and the culture of the 1970s, the time of patchouli incense, Palestinian scarves, and William Friedkin’s horror film The Exorcist (1973). He uses jute as the basic material for his knitted coats because it evokes “the sweet, social democratic feel of the 1970s.” There is something shamanistic about Gundersen’s knitted sculptures. They recall the Native American movement of these years, Patti Smith’s song “Ghost Dance” (1978). But just like gender, spirituality can also have a performative aspect. Reversing the title of Thomas Brasch’s 1977 book of short stories Vor den Vätern sterben die Söhne (The Sons Die Before the Fathers), an East Berlin swan song to the GDR and to patriarchal society, Urknallmutter can be interpreted as a swan song to myths of maternity. 
After the mothers the sons are the next to die: but not without managing the neuroses and depressions that were given them along the way. On Tore Magne Gundersen’s watercolors and gouaches, one sees faces and bodies that rot in the landscape and at the same time form a landscape; the hills and vegetation are formed of noses and body parts. The ego dies, its humus brings up new life. The return home does not lead to mother earth, but to oneself. Just as Grafe’s Opiumqueen and his cat goddess Bastet have something of the cabaret charm of a Sally Bowles, Gundersen’s works are also full of camp allusions to glamour, design, and fashion. But it would also be easy to imagine his coats hanging over the fireplaces on the concrete wall of a mid-century home. The mother is show person, drag queen, hippie goddess. Especially because the artists stage the spiritual like a performance, because they reject the strict rules of yin and yang, birth and death, the idea of an authentic life, do not hide their helplessness and their neuroses, the white goddess with the many names can descend into their art, the Urknallmutter who always wanted her sons to become artists.

Oliver Koerner von Gustorf

Translation from German to English Dr. Brian Currid

 

Peder K Bugge & Dania Burger

Opening: December 12 th. 2014, 7 – 9 PM
Loveburgers play lovesongs. Glühwein included.

A Fragment from the Life of Three Friends is the couple Bugge and Burgers first joint exhibition. The title of the exhibition was adapted from  the short story by E.T.A Hoffmann published in 1818. The story debates the difference between enthusiastic love and conventional marriage. After intense and important years of living on the island of Tjøme in Norway the artists are going to move back to Berlin, back to the city. This decision is based on the desire to create the best production and reception conditions for their work and to introduce themselves as artists to new contexts. Their future studio apartment, which is located on the E.T.A.-Hoffmann-Promenade, is the starting point for the project. A Fragment from the Life of Three Friends is an installation consisting of own drawings and paintings, artwork made by friends and the artists first joint artwork - a sculpture. Others, before Bugge and Burger, have also figured out th at the journey is the destination and therefore they do not only consider their lives, but also their work as an ongoing experiment.

Exhibition period: Dec. 12 - 19. 2014

Opening hours (by appointment): Tuesday to Friday 2 - 6 PM, Saturday 1 - 5 PM

The exhibition is supported by the Royal Norwegian Embassy in Berlin.

bodendertatsacheAuf dem Boden der Tatsachen. Peder K. Bugge

Peder K. Bugge is particularly occupied with exploring formal and colouristic elements. He plays on tensions between space and surface, figure and depth of field. This ambiguous approach connects his work to the nonfigurative tradition that flowered during the concretism of the 1950s. Bugge received his art education at Bergen Academy of Art and Design and in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. He also lives primarily in Norway, interrupted by long stays in Berlin. His works can be found in various private and public collections.

More about Bugge in Archiv

 

burger

 Dania Burger

Dania Burger often utilizes her own identity as a starting point when she scrutinizes the relationship between the intimate and the public, the close and the distant, the powerful and powerless. Personal relationships may be brought into play. Her projects examine the existential processes of life and deal with the permanent trial to acknowledge the immanent disenchantment. She  studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Hamburg and at Bergen Academy of Art and Design, Norway, and lives since 1998 mostly in Norway. Her work is represented in several public collections, including The National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design in Oslo, Norway

More about Burger in Archiv

 

junglecock-midres

Emil Holmer (SE) - Collage, Painting, Sculpture
Opening: February 7th. 2014, 7 – 9 PM
Music: Michael Maria Ziffels (DE)  The first performance of the work »Die Antwort lautet 42« for Baritone Horn, Controller and Computer. Baritone Horn: Jochen Sievers. Computer: Michael Maria Ziffels

Curator: Aage Langhelle

Exhibition period: Feb. 8/2014 - Feb.14/2014
Opening hours (by appointment): Tuesday to Friday 2 - 6 PM, Saturday 1 - 5 PM

The exhibition is supported by the Embassy of Sweden in Berlin

 

Notes on Paintings

In art it is hard to say anything as good as: saying nothing.” Ludwig Wittgenstein[1]

Let us not speak of the futility of those obituaries invoking the death or end of painting. They endlessly repeat themselves and this repetition becomes the repeated admission of their futility. And yet perhaps there is no painting – no painting at eye level with the present – that does not touch on its own death, once and again rubbing shoulders with its impossibility.

Perhaps painting means to touch  “the void in being and in the present.”[2] Perhaps painting today is, more than anything, opening to the crack in the continuum of being, affirmation of the inconsistency of reality. At the heart of every interation, affirmation affirms itself by once and again negating its futility. There is a negative power of repetition – the power of negation – that draws its insistence from the affirmation of the impossible: of the impossible or the nothing, which is to say the void or the absence of meaning.

Marguerite Duras said the same of writing, that it is probing the void. In writing, the subject circles the primordial loss of meaning.[3] That is what makes a document of futility out of every reiteration: the necessity of nearing the limit of manifest evidences as a means of opening the space of non-evidence, the zero-point of reality. Jacques Lacan called this zero-point the real, Jean-Paul Sartre addressed it as the hole of being.[4] What keeps painting alive beyond its death is the opening to a void that, rather than describe the non-existence of God, looks to the condition of its own possibility.

To touch on the boundaries of painting with its own means is something like continuing to live by not ceasing to survive – in other words, the process by which a person, as Derrida once put it, allows for the “complication of the opposition [of] everyday life.”[5] Painting could be the practice of this complication or complicating, while it enters the scene of the debatable compossibility of death and life. In a conversation with Donald Kuspit, Louise Bourgeois said that “art is about life,” which also means that it has to do with “survival in everyday life.”[6] To survive in everyday life is to survive in the indifference of reality, in what Albert Camus describes as the “benign indifference of the world.”[7] This indifference is evidently nothing other than the same ontological void as a synonym for the absence of meaning. In the space left by this absence, painting arises as the index of its impossibility, as long as impossible means that everything always remains to be done, so that, in other words, to paint means to do without absolute meaning, inventing signs and techniques of a life form that can integrate the unliveable into itself.

Painting at eye level with today can only be painting on par with this ontological void, the emptiness indicating the fundamental feature of all realities. The opening to this void implies a certain resistance to facts. Facts are nothing but facts, certainties only certainties: art knows that knowledge isn’t everything, that the responsibility of the artist begins with building up an affirmative resistance against all vulgar materialisms and positivisms, simultaneously suspending all idealisms that promise it a reality beyond this one (only to eventually completely de-historicize it later). Realism and idealism are pseudoalternatives – of the history of philosophy, of the philosophical aesthetic, and of art.
Marcus Steinweg


[1]  Ludwig Wittgenstein, Culture and Value, trans. P. Winch, Chicago: 1984, p. 23.
[2] Michel Foucault, in The Essential Works of Michel Foucault 1954-1984, vol 1, 1954-1969, trans. Robert Hurley, ed. James D. Faubion, New York: 2001.
[3]  Cf. Marcus Steinweg & Rosemarie Trockel, Duras, Berlin: 2008.
[4] Art is always about wresting the consistency of the work from a universal inconsistency, establishing a visibility devoid of any implicitness. It is because of this that the appearance of the work – its presence – comes as a surprise; because its evidence comes from the order of the non-evident. Art exists at the moment when this appearance tears a hole in the web of facts in order to darken the evidence of instituted realities, not through obscurantism or obscuration, but through clarity, through a surfeit of evidence.
[5] Jacques Derrida, “Living On“ in Parages, trans. Tom Conley, Stanford: 2011.
[6] Donald Kuspit, “A Conversation with Louise Bourgeois“ in Bourgeois New York: 1988.

[7]  Albert Camus, L’Étranger, Paris: 1942, p. 171f. [author’s trans.].

 carnalliaisons-midres

pigspay-midres

ohnomrmanlowres

 More about Holmer and Ziffels/Sievers in Archiv

 

junglecock-midres

Emil Holmer (SE) - Collage, Malerei, Skulptur
Eröffnung: 7. Februar 2014, 19 - 21 Uhr
Musik: Michael Maria Ziffels (DE) Uraufführung »Die Antwort lautet 42« für Baritonhorn, Controller und Computer. Baritonhorn: Jochen Sievers Computer: Michael Maria

Kurator:
 Aage Langhelle
Ausstellungszeitraum:
8.02.2014 – 14.02.2014
Öffnungszeiten (nach Voranmeldung): Samstag 13 - 17 Uhr. Dienstag – Freitag 14 -18 Uhr

Die Ausstellung wird von der Schwedische Botschaft in Berlin unterstützt.


Notes on Paintings

In art it is hard to say anything as good as: saying nothing.” Ludwig Wittgenstein[1]

Let us not speak of the futility of those obituaries invoking the death or end of painting. They endlessly repeat themselves and this repetition becomes the repeated admission of their futility. And yet perhaps there is no painting – no painting at eye level with the present – that does not touch on its own death, once and again rubbing shoulders with its impossibility.

Perhaps painting means to touch  “the void in being and in the present.”[2] Perhaps painting today is, more than anything, opening to the crack in the continuum of being, affirmation of the inconsistency of reality. At the heart of every interation, affirmation affirms itself by once and again negating its futility. There is a negative power of repetition – the power of negation – that draws its insistence from the affirmation of the impossible: of the impossible or the nothing, which is to say the void or the absence of meaning.

Marguerite Duras said the same of writing, that it is probing the void. In writing, the subject circles the primordial loss of meaning.[3] That is what makes a document of futility out of every reiteration: the necessity of nearing the limit of manifest evidences as a means of opening the space of non-evidence, the zero-point of reality. Jacques Lacan called this zero-point the real, Jean-Paul Sartre addressed it as the hole of being.[4] What keeps painting alive beyond its death is the opening to a void that, rather than describe the non-existence of God, looks to the condition of its own possibility.

To touch on the boundaries of painting with its own means is something like continuing to live by not ceasing to survive – in other words, the process by which a person, as Derrida once put it, allows for the “complication of the opposition [of] everyday life.”[5] Painting could be the practice of this complication or complicating, while it enters the scene of the debatable compossibility of death and life. In a conversation with Donald Kuspit, Louise Bourgeois said that “art is about life,” which also means that it has to do with “survival in everyday life.”[6] To survive in everyday life is to survive in the indifference of reality, in what Albert Camus describes as the “benign indifference of the world.”[7] This indifference is evidently nothing other than the same ontological void as a synonym for the absence of meaning. In the space left by this absence, painting arises as the index of its impossibility, as long as impossible means that everything always remains to be done, so that, in other words, to paint means to do without absolute meaning, inventing signs and techniques of a life form that can integrate the unliveable into itself.

Painting at eye level with today can only be painting on par with this ontological void, the emptiness indicating the fundamental feature of all realities. The opening to this void implies a certain resistance to facts. Facts are nothing but facts, certainties only certainties: art knows that knowledge isn’t everything, that the responsibility of the artist begins with building up an affirmative resistance against all vulgar materialisms and positivisms, simultaneously suspending all idealisms that promise it a reality beyond this one (only to eventually completely de-historicize it later). Realism and idealism are pseudoalternatives – of the history of philosophy, of the philosophical aesthetic, and of art.
Marcus Steinweg


[1]  Ludwig Wittgenstein, Culture and Value, trans. P. Winch, Chicago: 1984, p. 23.
[2] Michel Foucault, in The Essential Works of Michel Foucault 1954-1984, vol 1, 1954-1969, trans. Robert Hurley, ed. James D. Faubion, New York: 2001.
[3]  Cf. Marcus Steinweg & Rosemarie Trockel, Duras, Berlin: 2008.
[4] Art is always about wresting the consistency of the work from a universal inconsistency, establishing a visibility devoid of any implicitness. It is because of this that the appearance of the work – its presence – comes as a surprise; because its evidence comes from the order of the non-evident. Art exists at the moment when this appearance tears a hole in the web of facts in order to darken the evidence of instituted realities, not through obscurantism or obscuration, but through clarity, through a surfeit of evidence.
[5] Jacques Derrida, “Living On“ in Parages, trans. Tom Conley, Stanford: 2011.
[6] Donald Kuspit, “A Conversation with Louise Bourgeois“ in Bourgeois New York: 1988.

[7]  Albert Camus, L’Étranger, Paris: 1942, p. 171f. [author’s trans.].

 

 carnalliaisons-midres

pigspay-midres

ohnomrmanlowres

 Mehr über Holmer und Ziffels/Sievers in Archiv

 

overelid-web2a
Munan Øvrelid, graphics, photos, ink images, sculpture and a sound piece 
Opening: September 27th. 7 – 9 PM
Exhibition period: 28.09 - 05.10. 2013
Opening hours (by appointment): Tuesday to Friday  2 - 6 PM Saturday 1 - 5 PM
For a appointment and questions please contact Mr. Langhelle’s Cell Phone 0049-173-6035317 or send a mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The exhibition is supported by the Royal Norwegian Embassy.


Facts and Fiction – The Artist, his Father and the Objective (Un)truth
Munan Øvrelid's art is hovering between rationality and irrationality. His visual poetry is constructed dialectically in a tensional relationship between nature and culture, closeness and distance, control and coincidence. 

The artist's father, a retired mathematician, has withdrawn to a cabin in the Norwegian mountains, where he pursues his new hobby: birdwatching. The basis for the works in this exhibition is the collected mathematical data from the bird life around a bird feeder during a long winter. The material is determined by several circumstances such as the father's research method, but also the variable research activity which can be seen in the intervals of a graph. In the middle of the research period, the graphs show less activity, because the scientist had become a grandfather for the first time. The father's own life cycle merges into the research material together with the life around the bird feeder.

Øvrelid's sculptural and audiovisual descriptions of nature are based on rational graphs and diagrams, but when exposed to the weather, the physical properties of the material have been allowed to develop freely. Munan Øvrelid creates and interprets his father's mathematical material through a visual logic that follows completely different rules than those of the father's scientific work. The mathematical data collected by the father ends up in the hands of the son as visual poetry.

In a series of sound pieces, Øvrelid has, in collaboration with Marcellvs L, developed systematical and rational methods which are used on the recordings of bird songs. The method, which is based on the amount of birds per month, results in very different organic sound compositions. The pieces contain a sound spectrum that ranges from real bird twitters to the artists' own mimicked bird twittering.

Another work in the exhibition consists of a series of graphical prints from steel plates that were placed under the bird feeder. The plates are gradually filled with bird feces and become part of the ecosystem. They are transformed by the artist and become part of the economical system of the art world in the form of graphic prints for sale. Two different (eco)systems meet.

“As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain, and as far as they are certain, they don’t refer to reality”
Albert Einstein

The key elements of mathematics are formalism, notation, convention, symbols and clear rules, which are used in the quest for objective truth. The mathematician is the only scientist who can claim to reach an absolute truth. This absolute truth is not relating to truths in the world in which we are all living, but to prevailing abstract dimensions that the mathematicians have themselves invented. In modern history, natural science and mathematics have been feeding off of each other. For a natural scientist, mathematics is an important tool, and for the mathematician, new discoveries within natural science are the basis for experiments. Galileo Galilei was the first modern thinker to claim that the laws of nature are “... written in the language of mathematics, and its characters are triangles, circles, and other geometrical figures, without which it is humanly impossible to understand a single word of it; without these, one is wandering around in a dark labyrinth”.

Mathematics is a pure abstraction. But maybe because of the distance to our physical world, this structure of ideas will appear to be very well suited to describe and explain the real world. Today one can say that Galileo was right: practically all modern natural science, and also the social sciences, use the language of mathematics. But in Øvrelid's work process, the abstract truths of mathematics are transformed into physical objects marked by the chaotic subjectivity of reality.

Seen in relation to the history of art, one can also say that Munan Øvrelid is hovering between many directions. His work method shows a relationship to artists like Guillaume Apollinaire, Kurt Schwitters and Gerhard Rühm, who are all associated with concepts like surrealism and concrete poetry. In more contemporary times, conceptual artists like Hanne Darboven and Marianne Heier can be mentioned. But unlike Øvrelid, Darboven interpreted the material she used with the logic of science. Marianne Heier's poetical strategy is based on the underlying structures and value systems of our society. When Heier casts a diamond into the wall of an art institution, she raises questions about the relationship between art and capital.

Michel Foucault writes in his book The Order of Things:
“This book is based on a text by Borges. (...) 
This text quotes “a certain Chinese encyclopedia” which says that “the animals are sorted as follows: 
a) animals who belong to the emperor, 
b) embalmed animals, 
c) tamed, 
d) milkporks, 
e) sirens, 
f) mythical creatures, 
g) stray dogs, 
h) those who belong to this group, 
i) those who act like mad, 
k) those who are drawn with a very fine paintbrush made from camelhair, 
l) and so on, 
m) those who broke the waterjug, 
n) those who look like flies from a distance.” 
After his example, Foucault writes:
“With the amazement about this taxonomy, we reach with one leap what is called in this list the exotic magic of an other thinking
the frontier of our thinking: the pure impossibility to think it.”

Munan Øvrelid's works create openings in different directions. The works have many layers of meaning and can be seen as an investigation into the interaction between nature, science and art. One can also consider them a critique of our relationship with nature, in other words, a poetic criticism of the system. 

Aage Langhelle

 

 

Brown3Per Christian Brown
Photography and Film
Opening: 14. June 2013, 19 - 21 PM
Exhibitionperiod: 15.06 - 21.06. 2013
Openinghours: 15.06: 13-17 PM. 18.-21.06: 14-18 PM
The exhibition is supported by the Royal Norwegian Embassy.

The exhibition can be viewed as a poetic reflection on nature and its different elements, an exploration of underlying symbolic and existential aspects of trees and forests. Nature reflects the human being as a complex figure in a mortal world. Always striving upwards, the tree symbolizes mental transformation and childhood dreams, and, gripped by the storm, it presents a shivering image of human pain.

The tree as a natural phenomenon and the forest as a scene are recurrent themes in Per Christian Brown’s artistic career. The project ”Everlasting Material Pain” represents a study of nature encompassing analytical and emotional aspects alike.

The project revolves around the essay “L´Air et les Songes” (Air and Dreams) by French philosopher and epistemologist Gaston Bachelard (1884–1962), an essay focusing on an analysis of the relationship between the element of air and dreams and daydreams. Poems written by, among others, Rainer Maria Rilke, D. H. Lawrence and August Strindberg, deliver the material in Bachelard’s analysis of the tree as a vertical, symbolic and psychoanalytical concept. To Bachelard, the tree represented a connection between the sky (or heaven) and the earth and thus a source of multifaceted ideas.

The 16mm film ”Der Luftbaum” (The Aerial Tree) dramatizes the material in shots of trees, foliage and the birds living there. Poetic descriptions of nature written by various European poets form the film’s structure. All photo and film shoots were done in various nature reserves in Brandenburg, Germany, including Schorfheide-Chorin and Grumsiner Forst. The texts are read by the German actor Immo Kroneberg (with English subtitles).
Brown1

 

Per Christian Brown
Photography and Film
Opening: 14. June 2013, 19 - 21 PM
Exhibitionperiod: 15.06 - 21.06. 2013
Openinghours: 15.06: 13-17 PM. 18.-21.06: 14-18 PM

Aage Langhelle has put the exhibition together.
Per Christian Browns Works are also in MOMENTUM, Nordic Biennial for Contemporary Art
2013 to see.

The exhibition is supported by the Royal Norwegian Embassy.

The exhibition can be viewed as a poetic reflection on nature and its different elements, an exploration of underlying symbolic and existential aspects of trees and forests. Nature reflects the human being as a complex figure in a mortal world. Always striving upwards, the tree symbolizes mental transformation and childhood dreams, and, gripped by the storm, it presents a shivering image of human pain.

The tree as a natural phenomenon and the forest as a scene are recurrent themes in Per Christian Brown’s artistic career. The project ”Everlasting Material Pain” represents a study of nature encompassing analytical and emotional aspects alike.

The project revolves around the essay “L´Air et les Songes” (Air and Dreams) by French philosopher and epistemologist Gaston Bachelard (1884–1962), an essay focusing on an analysis of the relationship between the element of air and dreams and daydreams. Poems written by, among others, Rainer Maria Rilke, D. H. Lawrence and August Strindberg, deliver the material in Bachelard’s analysis of the tree as a vertical, symbolic and psychoanalytical concept. To Bachelard, the tree represented a connection between the sky (or heaven) and the earth and thus a source of multifaceted ideas.

The 16mm film ”Der Luftbaum” (The Aerial Tree) dramatizes the material in shots of trees, foliage and the birds living there. Poetic descriptions of nature written by various European poets form the film’s structure. All photo and film shoots were done in various nature reserves in Brandenburg, Germany, including Schorfheide-Chorin and Grumsiner Forst. The texts are read by the German actor Immo Kroneberg (with English subtitles).

More about the artist in Archiv

baummensch

Per Chr. Brown Everlasting Material Pain 1 2012 60x75cm C-print

Per Chr. Brown Scattered Limbs 3 2012 40x50cm C-print

 

Artists: Emil Holmer, Sonja Gerdes, Ingwill Gjelsvik, Jorun Viken
Curator: Aage Langhelle
Opening: 17. Januar 2013, 19 - 21 Uhr
Within the framework of the exhibition, the composer, cook and web designer Michael Maria Ziffels will offer small vegan delicacies for consumption.
Exhibition period: 18.01 - 26.01. 2013
The exhibition is supported by the Royal Norwegian Embassy.

 Many artists use animals in their work – both in concrete and metaphorical meaning. What happens when established signs for animals are broken up, changed and redefined, so that a new meaning emerges? This exhibition aims to explore how animalistic and organic structures are turned into objects or signs in contemporary art.
The term "animal" is a broad one. To sharpen the problem, two additional parameters were used for the selection of artists: Alien and re/structure. In contemporary art, there is a tendency to use alienating elements and processes to thematize our relationship to other species, while at the same time to examine how culture and society will be affected by this.
Our relationship to animals often is inconsistent and paradoxical. On the one hand, we as consumers contribute to an objectification of animals by maintaining an industrial agriculture, where animals are not worth more than their fur or the price per kilo of meat obtained. On the other side our pets are moved up the ladder in social hierarchy, and for many people they take over the importance of a "child" or "partner".
The common denominator of the works in the show is re/structure of the available organic material. The starting point may be an anatomical study or a collage that features an animal motif. More or less intended the artist looses some control over the work process. An identifiable structure, maybe the photo of an internal organ (human?) appears in an unusual context, is transformed into amorphous material or is turned into an unknown creature. The human element is relativized, abandoned to the free play of forces, we are left behind as bare objects, reduced to a primate, worthy of a post in the TV channel Animal Planet.
The exhibition may perhaps contribute to the debate on the ethical ideas on which our relationship to other species is based, and may thematize the political and aesthetic implications – both inside and outside the art.

About the artists:
holmer 900

Emil Holmer
"That painting had the working-title "transmitter" because of the bipolar structure. The two white organic forms are painted on top of two technological structures, which show through the finished painting.
I’ve made a lot of works expressing tension between two worlds. Often, one is technological, neon, abstract – the other organic, mindless, swamp-like. It's as if there were two paintings in each one."
comfyhoodapplication gjelsvikIngwill Gjelsvik
"The discrimination of others based on their species, race, or sex is a recurrent and fundamental theme in IngwillGjelsvik’s work. Earlier, she has worked with animal rights based on a moral position towards the abusive treatment of animals. In her new project however, her own life with her dog, and her experience of losing her beloved pet that she has shared her life with for ten years,form a strong presence. Gjelsviks own relationship to the surroundings near her home, and her daily walks with her dog Zuki constitute some of the many sources of inspiration for her art."

talismanforoxygenenergizer gerdes 900

 

viken-bird-700

Jorun Viken
"Anatomical drawings are Viken‘s point of origin. However, the progressive assembling of the animal‘s anatomy is followed by desintegration. The factual drawing study goes unchecked, and the drawings gradually change their character. A drawn organic construction is partly deconstructed. Viken‘s streak is expressive and powerful. Spreading over the arc, the ink is washing out the constructive figures and contributing to an atmosphere of doom."
 
More about the artists in Archiv
 

Artistic strategies in the Expanded Field of photography and images.
Artists: Philip Fürhofer, Gehrd Grothusen, Tore Magne Gundersen, Aage Langhelle, Randi Nygård.
Opening: October 18th. 7 - 9 PM
Opening in the presence of the Norwegian Embassy’s Counsellor for press andCulture, Anne-Kirsti Wendel Karlsen
Exhibition period: 19.10 - 03.11. 2012


This exhibition is based on the hypothesis that - against the backdrop of our contemporary technological and cultural landscapes - the reception of (art)photography is changing. In which way do these new conditions also lead to a modified meaning and position of photography?
This exhibition tries to map some subsistent changes and tempts to reveal how these changes are part of a process that leads to a new understanding and reception of photography as well as a partly change of content in the photographic terminology.
In general, the contemporary art seems to move in a cinematic direction rather than a photographic one. The majority of photographers and artists working with camera-based art in an expanded field were in the beginning mainly focussing on the traditional photographic object. However, many contemporary photographers in their own practice today appropriate and recode many different issues and methodes known from other media and artistic contextes, e.g. motives from paintings and filmscenes. In social media and interactive dialogues, the photo is still playing an important role, but other media and techniques such as video, animation or graphic depictions are partly taking over the role and position that the photo used to have. We also see that printed photos are often used as part of other artworks, such as installations or single art objects. Of course, the focus is mainly still on the photographic motive, but different layers of meanings are being created and visualized by their new physical appearance. What does it mean to work with photography under these changed conditions? Which role does a photo play, when it's only part of an artwork and comes along with more compelling forms? In other words, the exhibition tries to discuss the ontological and aesthetic conditions of photography today.
Several of the participating artists take their starting point in paper, photography's most common carrier. By e.g. the application of ink, the use of different paper types or printing media as well as other activities such as duplication, collage, drawing and cutting, the pictures are undergoing different physical processing types. This physical art practice is not new, but has been living in the shadow of more established genres such as Staged Photography and Documentary Photography.
The photography, that was the first »technical image«, was primarily used to communicate narrative and documentary contents, but seems to be operating more and more in an expanded field. A photo today almost seems to quote the established concept of »Photography« and takes over the position as a photographic effect in a more complex context than it was originally. It operates in new cultural and aesthetic spaces. The photography is going through a «reconstruction» in order to find a more actual position, especially in the contemporary art. You can see this ongoing change as a concequence of the tecnological, structual and cultural changes.
Contemporary photography may have lost the singular position in a restructured field, but the new cultural space is offering related positions in a team of different artistic practices. The game is not over for (art)photography, but the position has changed.
Aage
Langhelle


Short about the artists:

furhofer-detailPhilipp Fürhofer
«Fürhofer is painting everyday news on glass fragments, facades, entrances and doors. The public space is turned into a story-telling projection screen that lays beyond any commercial viewing patterns. He mostly constructs and dissolves open spaces. Especially important is the relation between nature, technology, science and research.»

potsdamerlandschaft-grothusenGehrd Grothusen
"Gehrd Grothusen uses the medium of photography, drawing, painting and photo copy for the technical, analog, digital and manual reproduction. From an ever expanding visual archive takes Grothusen individual motifs or closed series of images and makes it the starting point of his work.»

pg10wTore Magne Gundersen
«In his often enigmatic and ambiguous work, Tore Magne Gundersen combines a variety of media and techniques. Despite an element of black humor, the pictures insist to be taken seriously. Another feature of Gundersen’s images are the damped colors and the sometimes comic-like characters who reappear in several pictures and act in different roles.»

uncertain mapsAage Langhelle
«Aage Langhelle got the idea for this project in conjunction with the discussion about Google Earth's detailed photographs of urban space. He begins by pouring ink over the abstract cutout of a photo from the urban space. The result is an image based on the photo’s neutral technical grid and the ink’s expressive organic forms.»

der-augenblickRandi Nygård
«Randi Nygårds recent sculptures appear like three-dimensional collages, each presents an accord of shifting positions and perspectives. Formed by the recompositioning of printed material from books, magazines and prints, this work goes through an extensive process of cutting and folding, where strips of pages spring out and unfurl through the pages above.»

More about the artists in Archive

 

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